Concept

Dress in a vibrant costume, navigate a labyrinth,
live dancers flamboyantly interweaving between virtual and real — dreaming of the 1919 Chelsea Arts Club ‘Dazzle’ Ball.

DAZZLE: | Experience

Concept

Designed as a tourable interactive exhibition, the DAZZLE project reshapes contemporary forms combining fashion, art, music and choreography. 

A model for next-generation Mixed-Reality exploration. Embedding a local aspect at national and international venues, our scalable exhibition features events workshops, screenings, and artist talks relating to the theme. 

Intro

Gibson/Martelli & Peut-Porter join forces to re-stage a Mixed-Reality version of the 1919 Chelsea Arts Club Dazzle Ball. After five years of war, and inspired by the naval dazzle-ship patterns, the original Ball applied zig-zag motifs to costumes and set design, playing with audiences vision and perception. It was a one-off event that focused the era’s artistic and social energies so intensely that it immediately spawned copycats in Washington DC and Sydney, and secured its place in today’s cultural history.

Embracing participatory forms of theatre and inclusion with Mixed Reality, VR and AR, we situate our Dazzle Ball in the 21st Century. Our audiences engage in changing virtual environments, bringing to life colourful net-art and post-internet aesthetics. Individual experience emerges alongside collective understanding.

Dazzle offers attendees the chance to find their agency in virtual worlds uncovering and interacting with choreographed digital set- pieces and live improvisations. Procedurally generated costumes allow audiences to join the exhibition — coats, masks, capes and hats offer an introduction to the dazzling landscape. The visitor embarks on an expedition, fully prepared and supported to explore alternate realities — participants diving in and out of sensual and visual optical illusions, distinctive and part of the spectacle. Live dancers and audience members are modelled as animated dazzle characters, assembling in the virtual worlds.

Dazzle: Reality Fluid

There are three parts to our DAZZLE project, a combination of these animate the experience:

 

DAZZLE GALLERY exhibition featuring
DAZZLE VR – a live virtual reality experience and
DAZZLE BALL an evening event.

– programmable workshops & activities complement the exhibition.

Highly customisable, the Dazzle tour can leverage maximum value from each venue and community, curatorial practice determining the scope, size and specific focus. Partner venues can programme the exhibition with local visual artists, dancers and musicians invited to contribute.

DAZZLE EXHIBITION

The large scale Dazzle exhibition is an immersive modularinstallation a ‘Gesamtkunstwerk’ (total artwork) which ties together the dazzling theme. Each element builds on the concept of converting an audience member from a passive spectator into an active participant, beginning at the entrance where visitors dress in adaptable dazzle costumes, blending them into the installation itself. There are numerous opportunities for interaction and engagement moving through several experiences, including Augmented Reality masks, live performance, projection-mapped staging, spatialised sonic environments and Virtual Reality. 

DAZZLE BALL

Dazzle Ball is a ticketed evening event, a costume party reviving the joyful spirit of the original. Live music, fashion shows, performances and a Dazzle Bar contribute to the festive atmosphere. The Dazzle Ball animates the vernissage and finissage.

DAZZLE VR: SOLO, EDITIONS, LIVE

The VR experiences offer participants the chance to enter the virtual world, invited to take part in choreographed sequences and improvisations with dancers. 

DAZZLE SOLO is a single-user version for participants to experience at Home.

DAZZLE EDITIONS is an online multiplayer version featuring live-streamed performance – participants can be in the Dazzle world together. 

DAZZLE LIVE At a physical exhibition, our participants wear backpack PCs, HMD’s and trackers on their hands and feet to give an avatar body, enhancing the sense of presence in the virtual world. Our live performers wear specialised mocap suits enabling them to control ‘digital doubles’. Being together in the same physical space means that the participants see the virtual ‘doubles’. In turn, the performers can respond to participants in real-time – extending touch out of and into the virtual space. Here the dancer’s duet with the visitor, sensitively ‘listening’ to their responses and driving the interaction. Music and technology playfully encourage dance and interaction -performers and avatars blending with the audience in a live virtual reality performance.

ACTIVITIES

Education will be a core part of the touring exhibition. We will provide a menu of programmable curator- and artist- led activities grouped into four strands:

1. Artist and curator led talks:

Gibson/Martelli share their research and process in creating immersive virtual realities.

Peut-Porter present the history of the fashion show and performance in fashion, costuming and masks. Changing forms of curatorial practices, leaders in the field discuss new forms of audience engagement and performance.

History of the Dazzle ships and artistic practices and movements, talks including Futurism & Vorticism leading to the creation of this unique Naval camouflage.

2. Workshops:

Music: Turn the graphical patterns of the Dazzle Ships into tonal sequences and musical scores led by electronic musicians.

Dance: Learn the dance steps of 20’s and 30’s – led by professional dancers; this envigorating social activity aimed at all ages.

Mocap & VR Lab: Experiment with technologists & choreographers using dance, VR & motion capture.

Camouflage: Learn about today’s machine vision and how to hide from surveillance with Peut-Porter teaching the screen-printing principles of camouflage patterns & materials.

Zero Waste Pattern Cutting: Make your own dazzle outfits using geometric shapes for an eco-conscious audience. Dazzle Makeup: Take face painting to another level, playful and easily replicated at home, we anticipate one activity aimed at children and families & another aimed at young adults and activists concerned about facial recognition systems.

Dazzle Ship Painting: Work in miniature, participants create new dazzle patterns or replicating existing designs on model ships, testing them in our seascape simulator.

The team members have an established track record in delivering workshops along similar lines, planning to recruit local artists to provide these activities and talks. The style of the workshops is creatively shaped by the Dazzle project concept.

3. Curated film screenings respond to the exhibition: for example, Fashion on Film, the Bauhaus, the Imperial War Museum Archive, Analivia Cordeiro’s body of work.

4. Artist-led walkaround tours of the show. Experience the exhibition led by an artist.

Concept Images

DAZZLE LIVE VR

Dance

Dance

Style

One of the main ingredients of the DAZZLE project is dance, our choreographer Ruth Gibson began by researching social dancing of the time. The post WWI dance styles included Ragtime, Charleston, Waltz and Tango. 

We introduced our dancers to these styles and all of the dazzle concepts, influences and artwork, prompting them to create improvisations from these rich sources. Movement ‘flavours’ evolve from these interpretations — we work with expert dancers from well-established companies; their performance knowledge enables them to learn new dance forms rapidly. Percussive sounds and rhythms help to piece together specific steps. For the tour, our dance captain Hannah will work with local companies to teach the material, accompanied by with the principal dancer Harry, who will assist choreographing each scene. 

Mocap

Pre-recorded movement data is collated via a motion capture process. (Mocap is a special effects system where a performer wears special markers which are recorded by the computer as points in space, typically for use in 3D animation or games)

A library of dancers’ phrases and choreographies develop in the animation pipeline, and these formations in the game engine are loosely derivative of Busby Berkeley and his spectacular ensembles. Our performers re-learn the movement material from their avatar animations instead of from each other or video recordings. 

The animations consist of palindromic loops meaning that dancers recall and memorise the material playing both forwards and backwards. Through this process, the dance language becomes fragmented and different rhythmically, and the design of of the body avatar whether a mocap skeleton, or an abstract figure, or rendering, gives a different physicality. 

Perhaps ‘a new body’ emerges through this technology. 

With this system, the dance progresses and evolves, mixing contemporary and traditional. We compose dance taken from old forms but amalgamated with new techniques – influenced by the steps choreographed in the computer. Assembling and disassembling motifs, and sequences, building up and paring back. Groups, repeats and canons reflect this process to affect timing as dancers learn from the virtual, building new rhythms giving rise to surprising encounters. 

Interaction

In the Live VR experience, dancers ‘listen’, and observe how participants behave  how they respond to the two worlds, both in the realworld and in the headset, with the virtual dancing avatar they engage within VR. The dancers act as a guide.

Dazzle themes the idea of concealing, revealing and disorientating informing the development of the duets between audience and dancers. These arrangements become a new choreography — a ‘ Dazzle Style’.

As duets unfold, the audience enters this experience with wonder and awe, the compositions fresh and lively. My decision to allow the dancer to control the encounter is an interesting one, concerning agency in the virtual environments. Audiences can kick virtual balloons and make sounds with their virtual bodies, yet it is dancers who drive the action. Our dancers only see what participants are doing in real life. These relationships create an enjoyable, sensitive and friendly environment. The dancers ‘listening’ carefully to each audience member, watching and feeling how they approach the material. The audience member has to trust in the experience. Playfulness occurs early on through experimentation.

Costumes play a considerable part; in this case, digital costumes replace the physical clothes. At first, our audience finds themselves looking into a mirror, they seemingly view themselves, but actually, what happens is that dancers copy their movement. This game continues in the labyrinthic section where the dancer hides then surprises by stepping out from behind a pillar. Outstretched as an invitation to touch, the dancers offer their hands to the audience as if to partner with them – The avatar’s hands and the dancer’s real hands make a familiar gesture to enter the social dance. There is much more to be developed, for example, a nuanced relationship in each scenario, movement through the sections and the intimate duet with the individual. We need to pay attention to the liminal and the peripheral, making the experience fuller. 

As well as actions and dance gestures of partnering, we must not neglect the idea of chorus, extending the experience, multiple players and solos within the virtual and real worlds, a colossal dance extravaganza. A melange of actions riff on traditions of the early 20th Century, bringing them up to date through technological intervention.

Ruth Gibson

Mocap performers in custom suits

Fashion

Fashion

Peut-Porter craft costumes for both the Dazzle live performers and the audience – allowing visitors to fully join the costume ball. Dazzle clothing and masks extend into alternate realities offering opportunities for selfies in mirror rooms before diving into VR worlds.

Dressing-up in real life introduces and physically recreates the virtual act of inhabiting an avatar in VR.  Costume and digital double begin joyfully influencing motion and self-perception, bodies distorted and reassembled, allowing an embodiment of the surrounding dazzle environments. A series of codesign challenges with fashion schools worldwide have led to the creation of a series of unique zero-waste costmes for the audience. These free, open-source garment patterns can be downloaded from here.

The team are working towards procedurally generating ‘razzle-dazzle’ patterns which are digitally printed onto fabric. In workshops, attendees participate in creating costumes, cutting and assembling capes, shoes, masks and more. Reflecting the next-gen sustainable fashion practice, the zero-waste pattern cutting technique is used –  all parts of the cut fabric become part of the design. The workshops introduce the current trend of lending and renting clothes, the concept behind Dazzle fashion is to design for the experience age-old models of consumption rethought and presented to the public through this playful approach.

Music

Music

I am using the dazzle ships as a source for sounds, e.g. with samples of recorded metal parts, marine propellers that I modify, alienate, distort, chop etc… Synthetic sounds and audio effects emphasize rhythmic or random movement. Historic images of dazzle ships provide distinct black and white patterns that are analysed and transformed into sound effects and even instruments, generating sequences of notes. So I can turn the graphical patterns into generated sounds, tonal sequences or even music scores to be interpreted by other instruments on a timeline.
Paul Steinmann

Arriving visitors are offered a sonic experience – a handheld device allows them to ‘play’ dazzle patterns as instruments, machine reading a black and white image, translating it into sound by generating tonal sequences. Atmospheric audioscapes and ambient sounds are collaged from several sources and intentionally placed in space. Answering to and layering within a shared time code, each track can stand alone and also work together as one composition, varying in intensity from ambient to melodic, from atmospheric to rhythmic according to the physical location. Select experiences provide additional sound sources (e.g. binaural or directional speakers) either adding to the overall audio design or  isolating the visitors’ ears to allow immersion into significantly different audible impressions tied to each experience’s specific characteristics. Shifting, overlapping sequences create a homogenous, yet highly diverse and interactive audible atmosphere that will be orchestrated alongside lighting and spatial design.

History

History

Dazzle-ships in Drydock at Liverpool 1919 Edward Wadsworth

HMS Kildangan, 1918 IWM/Getty Images

‘Since it was impossible to paint a ship so that she could not be seen by a submarine, the extreme opposite was the answer–to paint her, not for low visibility, but in such a way as to break up her form and thus confuse a submarine officer as to the course on which she was heading.’
Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve lieutenant-commander Norman Wilkinson quoted in Chris Barton’s 2017 Dazzle Ships: World War I and the Art of Confusion Millbrook Press

Camouflage

Unlike natural camouflage which strives to conceal rather than reveal, WWI Dazzle camouflage uses it’s high contrast patterns to confuse rather than disguise. Artists including Edward Wadsworth were instrumental in designing razzle-dazzle geometric patterns for warships in WWI. The idea was that any given dull grey or blue paint scheme would only serve to contrast and reveal a ship against the sea or sky. Therefore, instead of hiding, a baffling pattern would make it harder for U-boat optical rangefinders to get locked onto the target, while obfuscating the ship’s direction, especially when seen at oblique angles. Each pattern was unique, compounding the problem of ship class recognition. Enemies couldn’t be sure if they were attacking a frigate or a minesweeper. There is only limited evidence of dazzle’s effectiveness – even though it was eventually applied to over 3000 British and Americn vessels, what is certain its that was a huge morale boost for the crews on the ships, the dazzle camouflage serving as a form of tribal warpaint. Despite its mechanical appearance, regular Dazzle camouflage ‘has nothing to do with ‘machine vision.’ Machines are incapable of a state of mind like ‘dazzle’’ (Bruce Sterling. 2012. ‘An Essay on the New Aesthetic’. Wired, 2 April 2012. 

Dazzle Camoufleurs in 1917, the Women’s Reserve Camouflage Corps (US) dazzling the USS Recruit (a wooden naval recruitment and training building resembling and operating as a battleship) in Union Square, NYC, 1917

Dazzle Camouflage Swimsuits in Margate,‘…widely published at the time by various  European, Australian and American news sources, Le Modes, The Sketch and  New York Tribune..’ (from Camoupedia)

Four British naval officers, distinguished for their success at camouflage, had charge of designing the dresses, and the ballroom looked like the Grant Fleet with all its warpaint on, ready for action. The jazz bands produced sounds that have the same effect upon the ear as this “disruptive coloration” has upon the eye. Who could have thought a dozen years ago, when the Secessionists began to secede and the Cubists began to cube, that soon all governments would be subsidizing this new form of art to the extent of millions a year? People laughed at them in those days, said they were crazy and were wasting their time, but as soon as the submarines got into action, the country called for the man who could make a dreadnaught look like “A Nude Descending a Staircase”…The submerged Hun with his eye glued to the periscope could not tell whether it was a battleship or a Post-Impressionist picture bearing down upon him… …in its new and dazzling guise it may cause collisions in the ballroom as it did on the sea. In these days when dancers do the one-step, two-step, three-step and on up to eight-step simultaneously to the same tune, it is becoming difficult to keep the necessary leeway and seaway. When a ship or a woman is disguised by dazzle decoration one is likely to be more than fifteen points off in judging her course.

The Independent May 3, 1919, p. 160

Fashion

Fashion after the Great War was imprinted by shortages, mourning and practicability, allowing immense changes to be introduced to female attire: clothes became dominated by dark colours and simple cuts, and a new monochrome look became common in womenswear. A much looser and less rigid fit became popular – designer Paul Poiret taking a stance by showcasing the first trousers and the non-corset fitted styles championed by Madeleine Vionett. The military look had crept into fashion, and the more active lifestyle was celebrated by female designers such as Jeanne Paquin and Coco Chanel.

Poiret Grey Suit 

Remarkably, the Zeitgeist of the time allowed some of the most influential french female fashion designers to rise and challenge the feminine silhouette – possibly the Gallic answer to the suffragette movement. 

Chanel, arguably the best-known designer of the time, went on to revolutionise many common standards. She worked in favour of comfort and the independence of women, in 1915 for example: employing Jersey fabric, up until then exclusively preserved for male underwear. 

Yet, Coco saw the material fit the purpose of modern women, and so the collection became an immediate success. Jeanne Paquin, a name unfamiliar to most, on the other hand, changed the way fashion was perceived, thanks to her many publicity stunts.  Paquin staged fashion parades and sent models to appear at social events including operas and horse races –  she can certainly be described as the women who inspired the very idea of the fashion show altogether.

Bauhaus

Synchronous with the Dazzle Ball, in Germany, Walter Gropius established the Bauhaus, literally ‘building house’ – a School of Building. Despite the name and the architect founder Bauhaus began without an architecture department. Gropius was intent on the Bauhaus uniting all art forms under one roof becoming the total work of art or ‘Gesamtkunstwerk’. Artists and designers including Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Oskar Schlemmer and Joesph Albers were the instructors. Bauhaus style emphasises function over form combining modernism and arts and craft emphasising futuristic ultra-clean lines. In contrast to the forward-looking vision of the founder, women were excluded from certain disciplines taught at the school and led to weaving by default. This concentration of talent produced excellent textiles artists including the resurgent artist Anni Albers. The Bauhaus school expanded to two sites in Berlin and Dessau after the original in Weimar. Despite Gropius’s apolitical stance, the school was seen as a hotbed of radical communist ideas and due to mounting pressure from the Nazis, the school eventually closed in 1933, viewed by them as a hotbed of communism. The staff eventually emigrated all over the world spreading their spirit which lives on in the Bauhaus movement, becoming typified by graphic posters and stylish architecture.

Bauhaus Poster

About

About

‘…giddying perspectives, algorithmic choreography and psychedelic dancing figures – humanoid, geometric or entirely abstract – that can pass right through you like digital ectoplasm. It’s pure fantasy…’

Sanjoy Roy The Guardian

We are an award-winning team creating the next generation of immersive performance experiences. 

Ruth Gibson

Ruth Gibson

Gibson/Martelli

Award-winning artists and experienced Virtual Realists, Gibson/Martelli are at the forefront of creating innovative methods and uses of technology to engage audiences in different contexts. Worldwide commissions include residencies in North America, China, Australia and New Zealand.
info@dazzle1919.com

Bruno Martelli

Bruno Martelli

Gibson/Martelli

Gibson/Martelli have exhibitited and performed at the Barbican, Royal Opera House, Institute of Contemporary Arts, Somerset House, Tekniska Museet, Stockholm, Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai, Detroit Institute for Art, and The Venice Biennale.www.gibsonmartelli.combruno.martelli@dazzle1919.com

Alexa Pollmann

Alexa Pollmann

Peut-Porter

Peut-Porter’s all-female design collective forms its own category, interrogating and imagining all that is ‘worn’ in its widest sense. Inherently future-facing, they create artefacts that investigate body politics and social change through the lens of fashion and technology.
alexa.pollmann@dazzle1919.com

Bine Roth

Bine Roth

Peut-Porter

Peut-Porter have worked and partnered with: Burberry (Creative Media Department), British Council, Design Museum London, Sadler’s Wells, Siobhan Davies Dance, Museum of London, National Health Service, Goethe Institute Dubai, Center for Arts & Media Karlsruhe, Victoria & Albert Museum.
www.peut-porter.com
bine.roth@dazzle1919.com

Hannah Burfield

Hannah Burfield

Dancer

Hannah trained at the Rambert School of Ballet and Contemporary Dance. A freelance dance artist, she has been working with Julie Cunningham and Company since 2015 performing & touring in numerous works in the UK and internationally. She has worked with the RSC, Serpentine Gallery and commercially, Hannah has performed with various artists for both music video and TV and photographed for British Vogue.

Harry Alexander

Harry Alexander

Dancer

Harry joined the Michael Clark Company in 2010, after graduating from Bird College. He performed  throughout Europe and in the United States, as well as Melbourne, Japan and Brazil. The London born dancer is also in demand with the fashion industry and most recently shot for Vogue. Recently won the National Dance Award for Emerging Talent.

Paul Steinmann

Paul Steinmann

Musician & Sound Design

Musician and designer, with expertise in scenography and experience design, composing for theater and art installations or creating ambiences for exhibitions. Paul studied Graphic Design at Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design. Worked for Karlssonwilker Inc. in New York, Meiré und Meiré in Cologne and Random Studio in Amsterdam. Clients include Nike, Chanel, Louis Vuitton, Museum Ludwig. A Young Gun X alumni, a design teacher & lecturer his works have been awarded and published www.absurd-dialog.com

Oliver Wrobel

Oliver Wrobel

Photography & Graphic Design

Oliver Wrobel is a graphic and exhibition designer who has worked on large scale exhibitions for the last 12 years. He works with 3D life-visuals on major shows at the Centre for Arts and Media in Karlsruhe, the Run-Run Shaw centre in Hong Kong or the Toni Areal in Zurich for openings and special celebrations and has a wealth of experience with motion graphics.
www.oliverwrobel.com

Luz Mabel Flores

Luz Mabel Flores

Costumier

Mabel has not had her sewing machine out of sight since she was 8. With 18 years experience teaching garment making at university level, she has a remarkable career working with Alexander McQueen, Bruce Oldfield, Victoria Beckham and Giles Deacon. She transforms lives through artisan making and education. A PGCert candidate, holding qualifications in accelerated learning techniques and a trained Autism practitioner, Mabel cares deeply about inclusion & neuro-diversity.

Piero Glina

Piero Glina

Graphic Design

Piero Glina is a designer working on narratives at the intersection between art, design and media. A lecturer at Zurich University of the Arts he has worked on large scale live visuals for the Centre of Arts and Media in Karlsruhe, Swiss TV SRF, the Run-Run Shaw Centre in Hong Kong and various commercial clients. Piero has a keen eye for structured story-telling and how to bridge gaps in an overarching narrative

Francesca Orlando

Francesca Orlando

Dancer + Assistant

Francesca graduated from National Dance Academy of Rome and Choreography Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. A dance researcher in immersive digital environments – her scientific background informs her choreographic choices. Spectatorship, space design and time perception, are all shared aspects of her practice. She works with choreographers Lizzi Kew Ross, Daisy Farris, Martin Nachbar and Jacqueline Bulnes (Martha Graham Dance Company) as rehearsal director. www.francescaorlando.com

Harry Løvstrøm

Harry Løvstrøm

Production Manager

Harry has worked in production for international film festivals and immersive arts events, ranging from talent & industry development programmes to XR installations and screenings: Sheffield DocFest, MUTEK, Raindance, VR Days, All Points East, BFI London Film Festival, BFI Future Film Festival, London Short Film Festival, and Mitcham VR Festival, among others. Outside of festival production, Harry has programmed and chaired industry panels, worked for VR distributor ‘Other Set’,  and in Marketing for Omnibus Theatre.

Alice Tatge

Alice Tatge

Dancer

Alice Tatge is an italian-american-czech choreographer, performer and director working in the field of combined arts since 2004. Her practice investigates the sensorial realm via a plethora of multimedia disciplines, somatic practices and dance techniques, exploring the politics of the body, questions of gender and cultural identity. Exhibited at:  Hayward Gallery, Southbank, Tate Modern, Barbican, ICA, London U.K. Artistic collaborations: Tino Sehgal, Meg Stuart, Lundahl & Seitl, Xavier Le Roy, Mårten Spångberg, Punchdrunk.

Axelle de Groote

Axelle de Groote

Dancer

Axelle trained at Trinity Laban conservatoire of music and dance in London. As a Belgian dancer she has the opportunity to dance alongside choreographers like Alison Curtis-Jones and Gary Lambert. She has performed internationally from The UK to the USA. Axelle can be found in music videos and charity events to help children who want to dance. Alongside dance, she is interested in photography. 

 

Emily Coates

Emily Coates

Dancer

Emily is a recent graduate of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. She has worked with Tony Thatcher, Alison Curtis-Jones, Lizzi Kew-Ross and Kennedy Muntanga throughout the course of her training. Emily will be continuing her training as part of JV2 (Jasmin Vardimon 2).

Contact

Drop us a line, we are open to partnerships & collaboration.

Studio

Unit #3
449 Bethnal Green Rd
London
E2 9QH
UK
Info@dazzle1919.com

Office

71-75 Shelton Street
Covent Garden
London
WC2H 9JQ
UK
Alexa.Pollmann@dazzle1919.com

Funders

FundersLogos

Partners and Supporters 

MotionRiver

Universal Mocap Streaming 
Introduction

Motion capture data streamed over the internet. Open-source, easy to use and available to all. Revolutionising the use of mocap for games, TV & film and theatre. Imagine being in VR and seeing a dance company from New Zealand live in your living room. Imagine a Broadway theatre director being able to give stage notes to an actor rehearsing in London.

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Background

MotionRiver is an open-source tool to stream motion capture data over the internet. MotionRiver interfaces with the Optitrack motion capture system right now with Vicon support currently in the pipeline). It creates provision for developers to add support for other systems. Our system takes mocap data and converts it into a universal format via a ‘Source’ app that sends it to a ‘Server’ app for streaming to the Unreal Game engine via a custom Live Link plugin.

The UKRI funded project seeks to research and develop this software, test it and place it freely in the public domain with documentation so it becomes usable, disseminating the findings across a range of contexts and outlets reaching – creatives, researchers, collaborators and audiences.  For MotionRiver the team formed a partnership with developers Cooperative Innovations and the Centre for Creative and Immersive eXtended Reality (CIXR) at the University of Portsmouth.

The MotionRiver tool is currently being used by Thayaht to develop DAZZLE –  artist Collectives Gibson/Martelli & Peut-Porter join forces to re-stage a Mixed-Reality version of the 1919 Chelsea Arts Club Dazzle Ball. After five years of war, and inspired by the naval dazzle-ship patterns, the original Ball applied zig-zag motifs to costumes and set design, playing with audiences vision and perception.

How it WORKS
SETUP
Partners and FUNDERS